sundaym.continentalshims c 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I grew up in Marshalltown, Iowa, in a house designed for my parents by Frank Lloyd Wright—surely an imprinting force on a mid-century, Midwestern childhood. Just as important to my artistic beginnings was a home-life rich in free time, outdoor space, and materials from the creek bed and surrounding woods. Summers were time for arts camp with sun-rise yoga, dance workshop intensives, and later, South Bear School for the Arts near Decorah, Iowa, where Joseph Langland compassed body, place and song in teaching the making of poems.

These experiences found shape and discipline at the University in Iowa City, with a double major in Art and English, an Honors Exhibition in Printmaking, and placement in Iowa Writers Workshop Undergraduate classes. An MA followed from Iowa’s Printmaking Department, with Mauricio Lasansky and Keith Achepohl leading the training of artist/teachers. 

The 80’s brought work as itinerant college professor, gallery director and curator; successful fine press wood engraver (Manhattan, Poems by Amy Clampitt, 1990); and exhibiting oil painter. The decade was productive, though decidedly not gainful. So again, I matriculated—this time at University of Wisconsin, where, supported on wings of the Graduate School, I enjoyed a provocative knuckling-down with Walter Hamady in the Book Arts/Letterpress Lab. I left Madison with food in my belly and MFA in hand.

My next prospect, a short-term teaching job in Pennsylvania, converted to an expanded package in the person of Pete, Guru of Spheres Binary, friend and spouse. Together, we migrated to Greeley, Colorado, where I headed Printmaking and Book Arts at University of Northern Colorado from 1993-2001; and where our daughter, Svetlana, came into being. Today, as Svetlana makes music out in the world, we keep our home base in Greeley and thrive, a little family of broad leanings.

above: Continental Shims (detail), improvisational tapestry, natural and synthetic fibers and ribbons, Margaret Sunday 2015
photography: John Blake